Xenodochy: The Lost Art of Hospitality

Photo by on

As a teacher of over three decades, there are several things I have noticed that have changed with kids through the years. Though children of the 21st century enjoy multiple advancements in the way our world operates and communicates, many come to school without training in the basics of life. As a middle school teacher who has frequent lunch duties, there is a growing number whose parents have not taught table manners or many others basic appropriate social interactions, it seems. It is not reflexive with school-age children today to say ‘please’ after a request and ‘thank you’ afterward. Many do not have good models of social behavior from the adults in their lives. Xenodochy, or hospitality, is becoming a rare thing in our society and it is not a surprise that kids are lacking in this area.

The word, xenodochy, is an ancient Greek word meaning the care and concern of your guests or, hospitality. This hospitality includes anticipating your guests’ needs and making them a priority over your own. There was a time, when I was young, where I witnessed neighbors helping each other and if you were a guest in someone’s home, they treated you with dignity and respect. As a guest, you were gracious visitors. These memories bring an ache to my heart as I look out over my classroom and think of what so many kids are missing. A growing number of my middle school students have no idea what dignity is and they think adults demands respect by shouting. We would all fare better with a little more xenodochy in our lives.

1. Being hospitable toward others is a command of God.

In the Gospel of Matthew, chapter 25, Jesus makes a list of actions (or inactions) of His people and points out that how we treat others reflects our relationship with God. If we feed the hungry, visit the sick or the prisoner, it reflects our dedication and obedience to God. By being inhospitable to others, it’s a rejection of God.

2. Making the choice to be hospitable is choosing to put others’ needs before your own.

Photo by on

Hospitality is incompatible with selfishness. If you watch the news on a daily basis, it’s becoming clear that many have made room in their hearts for only their own points of view and wants and needs. By being hospitable, you make the choice to look at other’s needs before your own, which fosters a positive interaction. Receiving people with kindness and graciousness is a gift you can give to others and to yourself. It is more blessed to give than to receive. (Acts 20:35)

Hospitality is incompatible with selfishness. Ifyou watch the news on a daily basis, it’s becoming clear that many have made room in their hearts for only their own points of view and wants and needs. By being hospitable, you make the choice to look at other’s needs before your own, which fosters a positive interaction. Receiving people with kindness and graciousness is a gift you can give to others and to yourself. It is more blessed to give than to receive. (Acts 20:35)

3. When you are hospitable, you create an atmosphere of dignity and respect.

Photo by on

By treating your guests with dignity and respect, you show, on a practical level, that they have value. When those who visit in your home feel welcomed and valued, it opens opportunities for many positive things. Hospitality establishes a safe and friendly environment.

4. Being hospitable sets a good example for children.

Our children live what they know. I remember my parents teaching me that I should let my guests choose what game we played or what to have for a snack. They taught me that there are many things in life that are, “not about me.”

Photo by on

These real-life lessons in hospitality and selflessness enabled me to grow up with this pattern of behavior engrained in me. Whether we like it or not, kids watch the adults in their lives and will emulate many of the examples they have seen and experienced when they become adults.

5. Being hospitable to everyone is a gracious choice.

We do not know what others’ journeys have been like, therefore, having a hospitable attitude in all circumstances can help others who may be in need. Everyone experiences a hard season of life and any time we can be gracious, we are aiding others in their struggles rather than adding on to them.

In addition to this, Hebrews 13:2 reminds us that, you never know, you could show hospitality to angels and not even know of it.

It’s always a good choice to be hospitable.

--

--

--

Just as our bodies need proper nourishment and exercise to be healthy, so does our soul. Exercise opportunities to keep your soul fit. www.susan-grant.com

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

The Source of All Wisdom: The Place Where You Learn to Be Wise

Genesis 1: Days or ages? Does it matter?

Day 17: The Different Kinds of Qi and What They Govern.

Overview of The Inner Spontaneous Sound Practices — Part I

Real is Raw

When Will Science and Religion Go to Marriage Counseling?

A couple having an argument on a bench in the park

How Writing and Journaling Could Change Your Life

Escaping a Christian cult.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Susan Grant

Susan Grant

Just as our bodies need proper nourishment and exercise to be healthy, so does our soul. Exercise opportunities to keep your soul fit.

More from Medium

THE GOD WHO SEES

An Important Message

Breaking the Chains of Survival Mode and Consciously Choosing the Thriving Life

Looking In To The Current Voters Apathy In Nigeria